Shoot!

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mvanrheenen
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Shoot!

Unread postby mvanrheenen » Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:22 pm

I like shooting B&W's, but have no idea how they turn out. I like them, but don't know what more experienced photographers think about them.

So, here I have 2 "product" shots which I converted to black and white. I want to know what you think about the look and feel of the images., as well as any technical comments you might have. Please, every comment is most welcome.

#1 Going bananas
Image

#2 Like clockwork
Image

I have one image that people seem to like very much. I can see why (the subject and perspective), but what's better about this processing than the other shots?

Image

Mark

David Kilpatrick
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby David Kilpatrick » Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:38 pm

Oddly enough, people prefer bright images. Most consumer cameras are now set to produce rather light, bright pix because that's what research has shown people like. Photographers often like low key, some discerning portrait clients etc also like dark images, but generally people will prefer a lighter brighter image.

David

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mvanrheenen
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby mvanrheenen » Wed Oct 26, 2011 9:45 pm

Hi David,

I can imagine most people like brighter pictures. I always find the more dim black and white images, preferably with a little noise, vignetting and "grunge" in the picture to set a more classical and warmer or more intimate mood.

Mark

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Dr. Harout
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby Dr. Harout » Wed Oct 26, 2011 10:36 pm

I think they are too greyish. We were discussing lately on how to convert shots to B&W. I was on the side who was strictly for having different shades of grey, not only as a B&W picture which has been overlayed with a thin gelatinous layer of dull gray. I admire High and Low key shots and not only bright shots.
You might say that shots made in fog are grayish too, yes they are, but not over-layered with a dull grey.
Your second shot is the best as B&W conversion.
Sorry to be harsh. But I guess we have to criticize much more each others shots. After all we are a truly friendly members here, which implies we really wish each other to be a better photographer.
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Birma
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby Birma » Wed Oct 26, 2011 11:53 pm

Hi Mark - I think a tad more contrast would improve #3, as the Doc says less of a plain grey feel. The perspective of #3 is great already :D . #2 is quite interesting, perhaps more contrast again. Not sure about #1.
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mvanrheenen
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby mvanrheenen » Thu Oct 27, 2011 9:46 am

@Doc: You're not being harsh at all! Please don't apologise for this. I appreciate any comment you might have, because I myself are unsure how to improve my images. I understand what you mean with the layer of dull gray. Every conversion I did had some sort of dull gray veil over it. My best conversions are those which were made by an old P&S camera, where scenes were captured in harsh light with big contrasts. And it is exactly Birma and your comment about contrasts and low and high keys which made me think: would that be my problem with B&W conversions?

This picture I took has much more contrast between the cliff, air and sea. Does this mark a better conversion? I do think so, but the level of detail is a lot less than say one of my more gray conversions.

#4 Cliff

Image

@Birma: thank you for your comments. It got me thinking about my conversions. I know that #1 isn't that special (it's just a banana), but the lighting struck me. If you have anything to add about the above, please do so.

Thank you both for taking the time to help me! It's really appreciated!

Mark

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mvanrheenen
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby mvanrheenen » Sat Oct 29, 2011 8:00 pm

As I'm determined to get a hang on the basics of black and white photography/conversions I edited the Roadway image to get more contrast in it.

What do you think of this conversion as opposed to the more grayish one mentioned in my FP?

Image

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Dr. Harout
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby Dr. Harout » Sat Oct 29, 2011 8:58 pm

Better but a bit too much of contrast. I think something in between would be great.
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sury
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Re: Shoot!

Unread postby sury » Tue Apr 17, 2012 12:44 am

Mark,
I struggled with the same question for a long time. For me, the big challenge has been and still is: composition. I lack that eye for the composition that many say you need to have, including having imagined your composition in B&W. I think that is where
the creativity/talent comes into play which I (sorely) lack. As for conversion, though I tend to separate process of conversion and the photo, ultimately conversion is a means to an end. You are right in seeking feedback since input/feedback from the forum members has been very valuable because they provide different perspectives which help me progress towards developing my own skill eventually (and hopefully in this life time :lol: ). That to me has been the best route.

With best regards,
Sury
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